RESEARCH PAPER
Russian information offensive in the international relations
 
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Faculty of National Security, War Studies University, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Ryszard Szpyra   

Faculty of National Security, War Studies University, Al. gen. Chrusciela 103, 00-910, Warszawa, Poland
Submission date: 2020-03-16
Final revision date: 2020-06-15
Acceptance date: 2020-06-22
Online publication date: 2020-08-28
Publication date: 2020-09-30
 
Security and Defence Quarterly 2020;30(3):31–48
 
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
The information war is beginning to play a dominant role in international relations. It is important because it occurs intensively in peacetime and determines the results of international clashes. This article aims to identify offensive elements in Russian theoretical and doctrinal views on the role and content of the information offensive in international relations. To meet this aim, a comparative analysis of research studies, documents and offcial statements was carried out. The study sets out to investigate how Russia assesses the usefulness of the information offensive for conducting international policy. The study revealed that the information war and information warfare in modern conditions in the Russian scientifc debate occupy a prominent place. Regardless of the declared defensive nature of the Russian information offensive, both the scientifc and doctrinal views emphasise the value of the information offensive for conducting international policy. Russia takes the information offensive in international relations very seriously and treats it as one of the main forms of international confrontation. This has serious consequences for countries close to Russia as it creates a new threat to their national security in peacetime.
 
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