RESEARCH PAPER
The roots of armed conflicts: Multilevel security perspective
 
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War Studies University, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Marzena Żakowska   

War Studies University, Poland
Submission date: 2020-05-14
Final revision date: 2020-06-30
Acceptance date: 2020-07-03
Online publication date: 2020-08-26
Publication date: 2020-09-30
 
 
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
The aim of this study is to indicate the roots of armed conflicts based on an analysis of a variety of theoretical approaches. The methodological framework for this research is Kenneth Waltz’s concept of analytical levels’ causes of armed conflicts: (1) the level of individual; (2) the level of the state; (3) the level of the international system. The armed conflicts are also generated by the nature of state regime and society, security dilemma mechanism, diversity between economic development, and rapidly growing population. The anarchy of the international system causes war, particularly due to the imbalance of power, power transition, challenging the hegemonic state by a rising power. The author presents a proposition of systematizing roots of armed conflicts and highlight the need for starting a discussion about developing approaches for the analysis of the roots of modern armed conflicts. The author highlights the need for starting a discussion about developing approaches for the analysis of the roots of modern armed conflicts. The starting point for discussion is introduced the concept of primary and supplementary approaches.
 
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