RESEARCH PAPER
U.S. Grand Strategy Towards Russia 2001-2017
 
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Department of Political Science, University of Latvia, Latvia
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Martins Hirss   

Department of Political Science, University of Latvia, Latvia
Submission date: 2019-07-19
Final revision date: 2019-08-26
Acceptance date: 2019-08-30
Online publication date: 2019-09-17
Publication date: 2019-09-30
 
Security and Defence Quarterly 2019;26(4):98–121
 
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Objectives:
U.S. foreign policy towards Russia is of the utmost importance for the national security of the countries on the NATO eastern flank. Grand strategies are among the analytical concepts for classification and analysis of U.S. actions in the international arena. This paper uses grand strategy classification framework to classify and analyse U.S. strategy towards Russia from 2001 to 2017.

Methods:
36 speeches about Russia by U.S. Presidents George Bush and Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden from 2001 to 2017 were used in content analysis. U.S. grand strategy classification framework was used as the tool for coding and classifying different foreign policy elements within these speeches to identify different approaches towards Russia.

Results:
The content analysis allowed to identify nine stages in U.S. policy towards Russia from 2001 to 2017. The most significant shift during this period was in 2014 when after Russia’s aggression in Ukraine U.S. strategy towards Russia shifted from liberal internationalism towards primacy.

Conclusions:
Ideas of liberal internationalist and increasingly primacist grand strategies do influence U.S. foreign policy towards Russia. The grand strategy classification framework offers a valuable tool for analyzing, classifying and identifying different foreign policy stages in U.S foreign policy towards Russia.

 
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