RESEARCH PAPER
Lithuania in European Union common security and defence policy context
 
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Political Science Department, Gen. Jonas Žemaitis Lithuanian Military Academy, Lithuania
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Donatas Palavenis   

Political Science Department, Gen. Jonas Žemaitis Lithuanian Military Academy, Vilnius, Lithuania
Submission date: 2019-04-02
Final revision date: 2019-04-25
Acceptance date: 2019-04-25
Online publication date: 2019-06-13
Publication date: 2019-06-28
 
Security and Defence Quarterly 2019;25(3):15–36
 
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Objectives:
EU Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) that encompasses 29 nations is gaining momentum. The aim of this study is to acknowledge ongoing developments in EU CSDP and define their impact for Lithuanian defence and security policy.

Methods:
Comparative scientific literature and document analysis method was used throughout this study. Article firstly reviews a path of EU CSDP developments, outlines roles and responsibilities of EU structures and examines current activities in CSDP framework with the focus to Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO). Second part is devoted to consider Lithuanian’s role in current EU CSDP context, to outline decisions that Lithuanian authorities made to implement new PESCO initiative.

Results:
Study reveals that: CSDP remains adaptive framework for EU; established procedures ensure CSDP is in compromise with all of nations; PESCO initiative signals positive outcomes while reinforcing idea of “EU Strategic autonomy”. Furthermore it was indentified that: approved National Security Strategy backs current EU initiatives; PESCO could provide flexible response options without duplicating NATO’s efforts; national participation in PESCO initiatives will enable improvements in cyber security and will enable rapid access for possible EU and NATO troops deployments; participation in PESCO negotiation phase reached given political aims to seek more extensive projects and position nation within core members of EU.

Conclusions:
Lithuanian policies’ shift for deeper engagement in CSDP is likely shaped by recognition that strategic trans-Atlantic partnership is not certain anymore, as well as UK role at post-Brexit period as 3rd party.

 
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